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Stephen Willats


Beyond the plan
2002
Chichester
20,1 x 25,6 cm
136 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

25 €

Materials 02. Cognition Control. From the Archives of Stephen Willats. Institute of Visual Culture
2002
Cambridge
28 x 21,7 cm
14 p.
Offset rouge et offset noir et blanc, agrafé

21 €

Multiple Clothing
2000
Cologne
20,5 x 15,5 cm
64 p.
Offset couleur, broché

30 €

The Artwork as Interactive Simulation
1998
Sheffield
21 x 14,9 cm
40 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

40 €

Random Encounter
1998
Southampton
21 x 14,9 cm
48 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

8 €

Changing Everything
1998
Londres
21 x 14,9 cm
96 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

26 €

The Art Museum in Society. Collected writings
1997
Cleveland
21 x 14,9 cm
80 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché, différentes couvertures

22 €

Between Buildings and People
1996
Londres
26,3 x 20 cm
144 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

25 €

Personal Interface
1995
Berlin
21,1 x 15 cm
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

35 €

Museum Mosaic Book
1995
Glasgow
21 x 14,9 cm
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

25 €

Living Together
1994
Glasgow
24,5 x 17,5 cm
80 p.
Offset noir et blanc et couleur, broché

20 €

PRIVATE JOURNEYS
1994
Londres
21 x 25,8 cm
8 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé, 1500 ex.

40 €

Taking The Short Cut
1994
Roydon
21 x 14,8 cm
24 p.
Agrafé

29 €

Häuser und Menschen. Buildings and people. Berlin 1979-1993
1993
Londres
28 x 21 cm
54 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

20 €

Tower Mosaic – Brinklow House – Princethorpe House

Tower Mosaic was an interactive art project that used two site specific buildings, the Brinklow-Pricethrope House, Warwick and the Brindley Estate, West London along with its residents as participants to create a mosaic in response to directions posed by the artist.

The artist Stephen Willats worked with six residents from each building to begin the project. He interviewed them about various domestic objects in their homes, how they felt about them, recorded their responses and created directions for the mosaic project for the tenants based off of these conversations.

A desk was set up in the lobby of each building to assist the tenants with participation in the project. Residents were invited to respond to visually to the artist?s directions by creating a drawing for the mosaic inside a tower book square. Ultimately, each drawing would became a part of one of the temporary mosaics that was put up in each respective building.

This book is a documentary of the the process of the Tower Mosaic project, but also reveals an interesting sociological aspect of the project as well.

1992
Londres
21 x 25 cm
8 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

22 €

Multiple Clothing
1992
Londres
21 x 14,8 cm
10 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

25 €

Corridor
1991
Gand
21 x 15 cm
32 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché, 500 ex.

35 €

Tower Mosaic Book. 29th April – 12th May 1991
1991
Warwick et Brindley Estate
21 x 15 cm
15 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

20 €

Concrete Window
1991
Montevideo
21 x 14,9 cm
11 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

30 €

Conceptual Living
1991
Londres
22 x 15,5 cm
32 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

42 €

Stairwell

Artist’s book, made from a walk at night down the stairwell of the building ‘Homecourt’ in the Highfields Estate, Feltham, West London. The black-&-white photographs are grouped in pairs (i.e. recording the view up and down the stairs at any one point); the brief text is a transcription of whatever came on tape during the course of the walk. The pages are numbered in reverse order, to correspond with the floors, (walking downwards).

1990
Londres
19 x 13 cm
15 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

25 €

Multi-Storey Mosiac – Homecourt

A description of this work made in a tower block at Highfields Estate, Feltham, West London in 1990 along with illustrations of the work in situ.

1990
Londres
21 x 29,7 cm
8 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

20 €

The House That Habitat Built
1989
Manchester
21,6 x 15,3 cm
14 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

96 €

Three essays
1986
Londres
30 x 21 cm
63 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

20 €

City of Concrete
1986
Birminghan
21,5 x 15,6 cm
48 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

36 €

Doppelgänger

The book features three people, a civil servant, a stockbroker and a woman manager. The daytime appearance and personality of each is juxtaposed against their night-time roles in which each dresses for and identifies with a particular sub-culture. The brief text consists of a commentary, in their own words, on the marked contrast between the two personae. The book’s intention is to show how each of them are, in effect, two different people at the same time.

Artist’s book, made in conjunction with an exhibition at the Lisson Gallery, featuring three works made with the individuals appearing in the book.

1985
Londres
20,7 x 14,7 cm
44 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

70 €

THE NEW REALITY
1982
Londonderry
21 x 29,8 cm
40 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

95 €

Cha Cha Cha

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, Willats became interested in the people that went to private clubs in London which functioned as capsules where they could create their own cultures and contexts.  The clubs represented a way for people to express their alienation with the normal, and come together within their own self-organised groupings.

The initial body of this work was presented in the Lisson Gallery exhibition of 1982, Inside the Night. This work concerned one manifestation of those private clubs:  an extreme rejection of society’s values, an alienation from its idealisations, that found expression in non-conformity and through the display of aggressively tangential codes of dress and behaviour.

The entrance to the Cha Cha Club was under an old railway arch, at the end of a narrow alleyway, underneath Charing Cross Station: The Club for people who don?t need to pose.  You can use the night as cover, as a cloak to be who you want, to be yourself, without anyone hassling you?The Cha Cha Club captured the spirit of this new generation?s attitude perhaps more than any other, where everything was possible if your attitude was right.  As a result of meeting members of the Cha Cha Club while making the work: Are You Good Enough For the Cha Cha Cha, I became aware of the extent of the night world that has recently emerged.  I went on to make most of my work over that three years with people who had been to the club at some point.

Stephen Willats, Means of Escape, Catalogue Rochdale, 1984

The cover of the bookwork, Cha Cha Cha shows the seedy entrance to the Cha Cha Club.  Each thick page spread gives the left hand, white side of the book as the normal and boring world of the day and the right hand, black side of the book as the freer night world and focuses on the thoughts and lives of the two people who organised the Cha Cha Club: Michael and Scarlett.  Michael and Scarlett worked with Willats on the book through interviews and photographs of objects from their daytime surroundings and of people in the club.  Quotes from the interviews are on each page alongside photographs of objects from their daytime lives and of people who went to the club.

1982
Londres
20,4 x 14,8 cm
Offset noir et blanc, reliure abîmée

Price on Request

Ich lebe in einem Betonkltz Märkisches Viertel Berlin
1980
Cologne
25 x 21 cm
166 p.
Offset noir et blanc, cahier à anneaux

30 €

Leben in vorgegebenen Grenzen – 4 Inseln in Berlin
1980
Berlin
21 x 29,7 cm
47 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

30 €

Concerning our Present way of Living

This publication accompanies the Stephen Willats exhibition at Whitechapel Gallery. It features an interview with the artist by the Archive Curator, Nayia Yiakoumaki.

The publication has been made possible with the support of Anne Mosseri-Marlio Galerie, Basel, Switzerland.

1979
Londres
28 x 22 cm
64 p.
Offset noir et blanc, broché

45 €

The Lurky Place

The Lurky Place existed as an area of wasteland close to Hayes, on the outer fringes of West London. The area is in the middle of a busy industrial suburb and is only about half a mile from the main shopping centre of Hayes. Although it is enclosed within an industrial urban environment, it remains physically cut off, there being few points of entry.

The landscape of The Lurky Place contains many images which are distanced from the institutions, norms and conventions which hold the fabric of society together. The nature of this place is, of course, a product of the surrounding society ? it forms a fulfilling context for behaviour and activities outside normal, daily life. The value it has for residents of surrounding housing estates is as a symbol of a consciousness which is counter to that of the predominant social stereotypes. The way peoples? destinies are largely determined by the dulling routines of their daily lives is contrasted with the freedom of pursuits and interests carried out within The Lurky Place. Elements of this freedom are transported from the constraints of our dominant culture and discarded in The Lurky Place, in the course of engaging in these various pursuits. Through these residual items, it is possible to structure connections between the consciousness vested in The Lurky Place and the restrictive society in which they originated.

The movement of an item from the urban environment surrounding this place to its interior represents a fundamental point of perceptual transformation of the object. Two types of transformation occur: – 1) an item is given a different use 2) the intended use of certain items is more fully realised by their being freed from inhibitory conventions. In both transformations, the implicit escape of an item from the restraining conventions of society also frees the person involved. For such a person, the item becomes a manifestation of another consciousness which is outside the social norm. the boring routines of work and home are relieved by the freedom to engage in uninhibited pursuits. It is the release of a culturally suppressed consciousness into a discarded area of land which gives the location its analogous power. It is within such a place that a consciousness, counter to that of institutional society, is kept alive. In this sense, The Lurky Place is a symbol of all such environments in urban society.

1978
Londres
Lisson Gallery
23,5 x 20,4 cm
24 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

80 €

The Meta Filter Problem Book

Willats uses books in two ways: in the first books can be as artworks in their own right. The other, as the example above, is when a book acts as a tool within the artwork.

Meta Filter was a computer based work that functioned between two people, it operated in a way that provided a formal environment and structure for them to externalise their perceptions of inter-personal behaviour.

The two operators looked at a series of images of people which were concerned with interpersonal relationships, perhaps on their own or with others and were asked to describe a series of social behaviours and questions of identity using a set thesaurus of words. The participants worked towards agreement, and in the process, became involved in discussions of how they individually perceived the problems presented to them and how they could reach consensus. The overall structure of the problems was to move from the individual?s relationship to themselves, then their relationships within a group, a community and other societies.

Each participant used a Problem Book to record their responses. The Book presented the problems on the left hand side and responses were recorded on the right hand side, this side was duplicated to record a copy. These copied responses were pinned up on a display so participants could also review the responses of other participants to the work.

1973-75
Londres
30 x 21 xm
29 p.
Offset noir et blanc, agrafé

95 €